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Did you know customer retention is faster and, on average, costs up to seven times less than customer acquisition? If you're looking to improve your bottom line by turning your current customers into lifetime customers, here's the best way to communicate with them. 

Communicate kindly
Customer service is key, whether it's in-person, on the phone, or via email, it's what everyone remembers. Mistakes and delays are inevitable in business, but people are happier to ride those waves with you if you communicate in a kind and friendly manner. It's not the mistakes that lose clients, it's the lack of communication around it. If you're not responsive, they think you don't care. If they think you don't care, they are more likely to look for a new company.

Communicate early
Put yourself in your client's shoes – if something doesn't turn up on time, you're left wondering, right? Communicate early if there is going to be a delay or problem they need to be aware of. People are really understanding if you say something early, rather than leave it until later when it affects their day negatively. Plus, speaking up early about a problem or issue will build trust.

Communicate when necessary
You often hear 'regular communication is best', but what if you've got nothing to say? Concentrate on creating great e-newsletter content so they're more likely to welcome the next one. Sending irrelevant, untimely, or lacklustre messages won't improve your relationship. Understand when people need your services and communicate to them then. Trying to pressure them through too many emails or calls won't end well.

Communicate cleverly
If your potential client or customer has requested a quote, you know they're going to read that email so throw in something small at the bottom of it that communicates your message. Or how about putting a joke or inspired one-liner underneath your email signature to brighten someone's day?

Disclaimer: The information in this article is of a general nature only, and is not intended to address specific circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Specific advice should be sought from qualified professionals prior to relying on any information received from this article.